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Sunday newspaper round-up: Twitter, British Airways, Russian oil imports

Relations between Twitter and and Elon Musk may be thawing if reports that the former is taking a fresh look at the technology magnate’s £33bn takeover offer is anything to go by. According to the Wall Street Journal, the two sides were set to meet on Sunday to discuss the deal and Twitter’s board was now said to be “more receptive to a deal”. – Sunday Telegraph
British Airways will open a maiden crew base in Madrid for short-haul flights in a bid to avoid the crew shortages that hampered travel last summer. Thus far in April, 1,400 flights have already been cancelled, marking the worst disruptions at UK airports for 10 years. But the move could put the company on a collision course with unions because the minimum wage of £6.35 in Spain is well below the £9.50 paid in the UK. – Sunday Telegraph

The European Union is readying a package of “smart sanctions” to foist on Russian oil imports designed to minimise the fallout for the bloc’s economy while responding to pressure to deprive Moscow of those revenues. “We are working on a sixth sanctions package and one of the issues we are considering is some form of an oil embargo. When we are imposing sanctions, we need to do so in a way that maximises pressure on Russia while minimising collateral damage on ourselves,” European Commission economic vice-president, Valdis Dombrovskis, told The Times. – The Times

The UK government may need to recruit Big Tobacco’s help if it is to hit its goal of less than 5% of the country’s population still being smokers by 2030. But anti-smoking campaigners are angered by the thought of any role for tobacco companies and some are criticising the lack of action over the preceding three years, arguing that there was still no plan, no investment and based on current trends zero chance of success. Yet of the seven million smokers in the UK at present, the statistical probability is that two-thirds will die. – Sunday Telegraph

Centrica, the owner of British Gas, is in the running to take over parts Bulb Energy, the collapsed electricity and gas supplier. Yet the fact that it is interested in Bulb’s 1.7m customers, but not the brand, staff or offices could be controversial, not least because as it is also seeking government help for the transaction. Nonetheless, the special administration process under which the company is being run is expected to cost the government £2.2bn. – Financial Mail on Sunday

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